things that grow down by the bog

There is a huge bog at the back of the property that in the winter looked desolate with no foliage. Now, it has a giant field of these flowers surrounding it. They are chest height with beautiful yellow flowers. And some bug friends. Flag Iris. Iris pseudacorus is a species of iris, native to Europe, western Asia and northwest Africa. Common names include yellow iris and yellow flag. Its specific epithet, meaning “false acorus,” refers to the similarity of its leaves to those of Acorus calamus, as they have a prominently veined mid-rib and sword-like shape. Iris pseudacorus grows best in very wet conditions, and is often common in wetlands, where it tolerates submersion, low pH, and anoxic soils. The plant spreads quickly, by both rhizome and water-dispersed seed. It fills a similarniche to that of Typha and often grows with it, though usually in shallower water. While it is primarily an aquatic plant, the rhizomes can survive prolonged dry conditions.

This is what exploded in a weekend and covered the topsy turvy plants, that we had to move. This a huge gorgous trellis that runs the length of the garden fence. Wisteria! Wisteria (also spelled Wistaria or Wysteria) is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae, that includes ten species of woody climbing vines native to the Eastern United States and to ChinaKorea, and Japan.

This plant is also growing down by the bog. It is currently over our heads. I think it’s an African plant? Each leaf is approx 3-4 feet in diameter. Huge. In the fall we put a giant load of raked maple leaves on it for the winter.  I wonder if we can eat any part of it? Another bog lovin plant! wiki:     Gunnera is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants, some of them gigantic. The genus is the only member of the family Gunneraceae.The 40-50 species vary enormously in leaf size. Gunnera manicata, native to the Serra do Mar mountains of southeastern Brazil, is perhaps the largest species, with leaves typically 1.5-2 m (5-6 ft) wide, but exceptionally long, up to 3.4 m (11 ft), borne on thick, succulent leaf stalks (petioles) up to 2.5 m (8 ft) long. It germinates best in very moist, but not wet, conditions and temperatures of 22 to 29 °C.

Make (grow) Something Every Day

Just like I did when I was 3 years old & even more fun at 38 years old.

camping on Vancouver Island, BC. Exactly between the West Coast Trail and the Juan De Fuca Trail.                May 2012.

photo kinda crappy, sorry

Steps to make your very own shells in a  glass vase,  vases ( for your work side table or a table centre piece etc)

  1. Have your fantastic husband take you away on a “real” west coast camping adventure. Ours was all down the Juan Da Fuca trail, last week. Camping trip details to be blogged after I get back to work.
  2. Spend hours in the sun and mist just flipping over sea shells. Just like I did when I was 3 years old and even more fun at 38 years old.
  3. Sit by the campfire at night with some water and clean the ass smell or possible live mini carbs and sand off of your gems. Seal in safe storage for journey home. Just like I did when I was 3 years old and even more fun at 38 years old.
  4. Get that same adorable husband from step 1 to take you to Ikea on the way home.
  5. Purchase the three glass vases for under ten bucks deal as shown above.
  6. When you are home, alone, in the rain, by the woodstove~ assemble your shells lovingly into whimsical shell vases.
  7. Take them to work so when your clients are talking you are also daydreaming of flipping shells on a ” real” west coast beach.. in the sun.. with your super fun husband.
Make Something Every Day

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the baby robin eggs ~ daily photography of the hatching process

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This was a very fun photo experiment. I held up my iphone every day to the nest and took photos or videos. Videos are on youtube & will be published here soon. The nest was discovered on my craftroom porch end of April and now we have baby robins! I posted then about info on bird eggs hatching as I knew nothing about it. I think it takes 14 days to hatch an egg and 14 days til they take flight after hatching!

Best part? screaming out loud when 3 little heads popped up to great my phone, one morning! 

DISCLAIMER: no baby birds or nest were touched / harmed during this photo shoot. 

Make Something Every Day

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