Who’se A Chubby Kitty?

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Well, I experimented with a second rescue remedy recipe for my cat Salal. Although he has perhaps doubled (?) his weight in a month ~ and for sure his energy and fiest has tripled.. I thought I’d vary up his diet and try this one. Again ~  easy to make  and he loves it. I promise to use cheaper chicken next time, babe.

Make Something Every Day

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The Joys of Pregnancy Hair

HAPPY BIRTHDAY HILARY

& Happy October everyone! 

Well, it’s no secret that I am 4 months pregnant! woot woot! Month three rocked (& a bit of writing about the first trimester is yet to come). But the changes that have come with month four include some mega affects on my  hair. I swear by the pricey and totally worth it CHI conditioning treatment that my stylish gucci-loving stylist performs quaterly… but you can’t use harsh chemicals when you are knocked up. I envision myself as even more organic while pregnant ~so am open to trying new things. Fast forward to home problem solving some seriously knotted, half fuzzed out, half straight, dried out red, hair. I googled and yahoo’d my way through some hilarious home kitchen remedy hair conditioners, one hormonal weekend night.

So… I gave the ol avocado and mayo treatment a whirl. See photo above for ingredients. It’s  a fairly straight forward process of mix em all together and lather on. I lathered from root to tip and put a plastic bag over my head for an hour. My husband was agasp and as usual, humoured  my creativity. After an hour I rinsed the messy, stinky, clumpy bits of greeen out in the tub. Then shampoo’d. Results? Nothing really, meh. My hair was soft but smelled like breakfast foods. Save your mayo for the sandwiches you’ll want in months 4-6 ladies. And please don’t tell my stylist I tried this at home!

The positive to this omelette hair DIY? I discovered LUSH in Vancouver a few months ago. During the holy shit I smell even after showering hormonal body odour stage. They saved me and my marriage with their sold deo. I  have a new love for my pits now. So.. I looked online, on another night of low hair self esteem. I splurged with my Sin-tax monies. They have a Therapy (lol) massage bar for growing bellies that might just take me out of the running for developing stretch marks (fingers crossed). So I ordered two bars.

I also ordered a hair conditionng treatment black pot, I think called Jazmin & Henna Hair Fluff Eaze? I placed my order online, paid $6 for UPS delivery and it was on my doorstep when I got home.. TWO DAYS LATER! YEAH LUSH. Now to try it this weekend. I’ll keep you posted. click here for the LUSH website for ordering

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what I’m learning about Robin’s eggs & more photos

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I’m going to attempt to photo them every day. I’m labeling them day 1 realizing that I have no idea when they were hatched. TODAY I saw momma Robin incubating! Above are today’s photos of the eggs and the nest location on my craftroom porch. I feel a bit weird about this to tell you all the truth. I was vegetarian for many years then ate meat the last decade.. now considering switching back. The connection was not lost on me this morning as I was trying to crack open my breakfast hard boiled egg, with my fake nails ~ while editing bird egg photos. I love nature and plants and animals big time but I’ve never really gained the maturity about the death part of animals. *Kate ~ remember giving me the cycle of life speech at 20 yrs old when Salal cat brought the dead bat into the bathroom for me? *  Currently our 14 yr old aged dog is in his last “days” and it’s heart breaking. When I’m healthy enough I see that it’s all a  beautiful thing but.. what if the baby birds are dead when i hold the camera up there one day? or fall out of their best. Nature meets art, I digress.

The following article came from http://wwwlearner.org/jnorth/tm/robin/EggstaEggstra.html  

Eggstra! Eggstra! The Story of Robin Eggs

The main purpose of a robin’s life is to make more robins. Migration, territory, courtship, nest building, egg laying, incubation, and care of the young are all parts of the breeding cycle. These activities happen so robins can pass their genes on to new generations — and the cycle begins again. Here’s the story behind those little blue eggs and the natural instincts that let mom know what to do.

Early Birds Catch Worms, Then Lay Eggs
Most birds lay their eggs at sunrise, but NOT robins! They lay their eggs at mid-morning. That’s several hours later than most birds lay eggs. For robins, this makes good sense. Robins eat a lot of earthworms during the breeding season, and they use those early dark hours to hunt for worms because worms are most available before the sun gets too high. Robins lay their eggs mid-morning after feasting on worms. A robin can then fly over to her nest and lay her eggs easily, but most other birds seem to need a long period of quiet before they can lay eggs. Those other species can get a big breakfast even if they eat late because they don’t want worms anyway!

An Egg a Day is Work
If you think laying an egg is easy, think again! Robins lay only one egg per day for good reasons. Female birds have one working ovary, unlike mammals, which have two. Ovaries are the organs where eggs are produced. A bird’s ovary looks like a tiny bunch of different-sized grapes. These “grapes” are the ova, or actually the yolks. The one ovum about to be released looks huge. One or two are about half this size, a few more are a bit smaller, and the rest of the ova are tiny. About once a day, the largest yolk is ovulated. That means it pops off the ovary and starts traveling down a tube to the outside of the robin’s body. This tube is called the oviduct.

If a female robin has mated with a male, the yolk will become fertilized. If the robin hasn’t mated, the yolk still goes down the oviduct and will be laid like a normal robin egg, but it won’t develop into a robin. As the yolk travels through the oviduct, the tube’s walls slowly secrete (drip out) watery proteins called albumen to surround the yolk. Near the end of the trip down the tube, the oviduct secretes calcium compounds. The calcium compounds will become the eggshell, but the egg will remain a bit soft until it is laid. You can imagine why the formation of an egg is a tremendous drain on a mother robin’s body!

Stopping At Four
Robins usually lay four eggs and then stop. Like most birds, they lay one egg a day until their clutch is complete. If you remove one egg each day, some kinds of birds will keep laying for a long time, as if they can stop laying only when the clutch of eggs feels right underneath them. Robins normally lay four eggs. 

On The Nest
Until they’ve laid a full clutch, robins allow all the eggs to stay cool so the babies don’t start to develop. That’s pretty smart! It means all the babies hatch close to the same time. Mother robins may start incubating their eggs during the evening after the second egg is laid, or after all the eggs are laid. They sit on the eggs for 12 to 14 days. The female usually does all the incubating. Even in good weather, she rarely leaves her eggs for more than 5 to 10 minutes at a time.

It’s mom’s job to maintain the proper incubation temperature, keeping the eggs warm during cold weather and shaded during really hot weather. She also must turn or rotate the eggs several times daily. She hops on the rim of the nest and gently rolls the eggs with her bill. Turning the eggs helps keep them all at the same temperature and prevents the babies from sticking to the insides of the eggshells. Males only occasionally sit on the eggs, but they hang out in the territory throughout the daylight hours and respond immediately if the female gives a call of alarm. A male may even bring food to feed his mate, but usually she leaves the nest to feed herself.

Some birds, like hawks and owls, lay their eggs when weather is still very cold, and start to incubate as soon as the first egg is laid. The egg they laid on the first day hatches out a day before the egg they laid on the second day, which hatches a day before the third day’s egg. Therefore, the oldest baby may be a lot bigger than the smallest baby. If hunting is very bad and the babies are very hungry, the biggest may sometimes eat the smallest. The oldest baby leaves the nest before the later babies, too.

Sharing Her Body Heat
The eggs must be kept warm to develop. A robin’s body is 104 degrees F. or even warmer. Feathers insulate by keeping the bird’s body heat inside, and the outer feathers can still feel cool to the touch. That’s why female robins need a special way to keep their eggs warm. They have an incubation patch, or brood patch, which is a place on their bellies where their feathers fall out. A mother robin shares her body warmth by parting her outer feathers and then pressing her hot bare tummy against her eggs or her young nestlings. Outer feathers cover the bare area so the brood patch is hidden. (It’s a little like keeping the oven door closed so the heat stays inside.) Scientists who hold a female robin for banding will often blow on the tummy feathers to see if a brood patch is hiding underneath.

Many birds apparently sense the egg temperature with receptors in the brood patches. This helps the birds determine how much time to spend on eggs, and they can change their incubation behavior accordingly. For example, they may sit more or less tightly on the eggs, or leave the eggs exposed while going to feed or drink.

Fighting its way out of the egg isn’t easy for a chick. First it breaks a hole in the shell with its egg tooth, a hard hook on its beak. Then it must struggle with all its might, between periods of rest, to get out. No wonder hatching may take a whole day. The eggs usually hatch a day apart in the order they were laid. Naked, reddish, wet, and blind, the babies require A LOT of food. Now it becomes a full time job for both parents to protect the nest, find food, and feed the clamoring babies during the 9-16 days they spend in the nest.

Make Something Every Day

the Honeymoon’s Over Poo

Guess what I’m making today, folks? Did the subject title give it away?

Day 3 of the wild rose herbal detox and I’m glad to not be at work today, I’ll tell you. Or maybe I won’t. Lol. Let’s just say its been very eventful since last night. I’ve done these a few times over the years (& should do them annually at spring), but it’s been a couple years of toxicin buildup this time. New packaging, same Canadian made herbal 6 pills / day formula and that tincture smell is one of a kind. If you’ve done it, you know what I’m on about.

I’ll leave you with excerpts from an Xmas book from my loving husband- who when I met~ I wouldn’t even say the word “poo”.

 

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websites should not be DIY projects for me

It’s time to restart my island art therapy website so that i can link it to my other agency psychotherapy website (which is also undergoing a make over at this time). Issue is.. i had JUST managed to understand mobileMe for Apple (which makes free websites for those of us that are low level computer geeks). Trouble is.. and let me BOO APPLE here… mobile me is expiring as a program and everything is moving over to the iCloud era. I’d embrace the change but you lose all your mobile me if you don’t UPGRADE your computer to the newer MORE EXPENSIVE ($50) system to then be able to install the iCloud program. BOO. I printed all of my website pages as a back up while I attempt to figure out what to do. This doesn’t feel like a creative project anymore. growl. (did I just talk about computers for a whole paragraoph?) pardon my vent.

Regadless of my emotions, it leaves me without ideas how to get around it or how to begin a new website. I have all the images I need and all the wording and links etc. ANY ADVICE FOR ME????? PRETTY PLEASE COMMENT BELOW. ~danke.

In the interim i have made another journal of  What Is Art Therapy for my waiting rooms. Details soon.

For now, here’s some anonymous (consentually shared & mostly mine) artwork from my art therapy practice. 

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Art therapy is a mental health profession that uses the creative process of art making to improve and enhance the physical, mental and emotional well-being of individuals of all ages. It is based on the belief that the creative process involved in artistic self-expression helps people to resolve conflicts and problems, develop interpersonal skills, manage behaviour, reduce stress, increase self-esteem and self-awareness, and achieve insight. Art therapy integrates the fields of human development, visual art (drawing, painting, sculpture, and other art forms), and the creative process with models of counseling and psychotherapy.

As a mental health profession, art therapy is employed in many clinical and other settings with diverse populations. Art therapy can be found in non-clinical settings, as well as in art studios and in creativity development workshops. Closely related in practice to marriage and family therapists and mental health counselors, U.S. art therapists are licensed under various titles, depending upon their individual qualifications and the type of licenses available in a given state. Art therapists may hold licenses as art therapists, creative arts therapists, marriage and family therapists, counselors of various types, psychologists, nurse practitioners, social workers, occupational therapists, rehabilitation therapists or others. Art therapists may have received advanced degrees in art therapy or in a related field, such as psychology, in which case they then obtain post-master or post-doctorate certification as an art therapist.  Art therapists work with populations of all ages and with a wide variety of disorders and diseases. Art therapists provide services to children, adolescents, and adults, whether as individuals, couples, families, or groups.

Using their evaluative and psychotherapy skills, art therapists choose materials and interventions appropriate to their clients’ needs and design sessions to achieve therapeutic goals and objectives. They use the creative process to help their clients increase insight, cope with stress, work through traumaticexperiences, increase cognitive, memory and neurosensory abilities, improve interpersonal relationships and achieve greater self-fulfillment. Many art therapists draw upon images from resources such as ARAS (Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism) to incorporate historical art and symbols into their work with patients. Depending on the state, province, or country, the term “art therapist” may be reserved for those who are professionals trained in both art and therapy and hold a master or doctoral degree in art therapy or certification in art therapy, obtained after a graduate degree in a related field. Other professionals, such as mental health counselors, social workers, psychologists, and play therapists combine art therapy methods with basic psychotherapeutic modalities in their treatment.Assessing elements in artwork can help therapists understand how well a client is in-taking information.

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