Wes Anderson delivers again

Movie review! We don’t have a theatre on the island where we currently reside. So when we get off island / on mini vaca’s we take in flicks. When in Vancouver recently, we went to the movies two nights in a row. The Avengers in 3D & some forgettable Johnny Depp is a vampire this week ~movie. But tonight!? Tonight we saw a whimsical movie after my own heart. The very creative, colorful & odd Wes Anderson movie ~Moonrise Kingdom. 4.5 stars (out 5). The cast, staging, soundtrack, geography, and set up of the movie were glorious. This movie has craftsmanship. For whatever that’s worth. It ended and I had ~that head tilted to side ~ thing happening. I wanted to see it again as soon as possible. Lovely.

If you loved The Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Darjeeling, The L:ife Aquatic and The Royal Tennenbams you are in good company with Moonrise Kingdom. Just the right amount of French Music combined with just enough saturated down colours equal a delicious piece of fun. The plot could have been deeper but it really was an essential must see movie. He really loves the dioramas. This video is Bill Murray giving a set tour. So Bill. 

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The Big Spring

The Big Year. This was a corny movie about birders but it had some whimsey and motivated me to photograph more of the wildlife in my yard. The eagle photo essay is from Rebecca Spit Provincial Park the same day. I haven’t taken so many eagle photos since living on the Gwaii. I’m enjoying my “old” SLR these days.

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Day 3 of the new feeder up & I have hummingbirds! I haven’t caught them on film just yet. stay tuned. lol. I hung a wild bird seed feeder low on a sliding door to torment my cats. It’s working. Yeah me. I’ve placed daffodils from my yard in each of my therapy offices & in busy rooms in our house. Now the tulips and lilacs are up. Double yeah!

Have you checked out     hornby island eagles live web cam and chat click here.

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Related articles

New video project. or My Love Affair with KODAK

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Last week’s $5 craigslist score (delivered to my work again by the same fella I got the 100 records from last month, cool, heh?) is a reel to reel 8mm film editor. Perfect vintage and clean condition. I fired her up today and voila! I was teared up instantly, watching my brother’s first steps in 1971!! Wild stuff.
Lots to learn but I enjoy the old technology.
I have a giant ziploc of 8mm films (20+) from 1970/1980 that were taken on my late Nana’s video cameras. Thanxs to my sweety for digging them out of our storage room, I mean guest quarters, this aft.
Some of you may ask… Why not take these to a dude to put on a DVD? Well, they have been but those DVDs reside in Ontario & these are the back ups. I’m going to enjoy this process while I enjoy my record a day blog.

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Here’s a WIKI section on 8mm for those (like me) that never knew before today):

The standard 8 mm (also known as regular 8) film format was developed by the Eastman Kodak company during the Great Depression and released on the market in 1932 to create a home movie format that was less expensive than 16 mm. The film spools actually contain a 16 mm film with twice as many perforations along each edge than normal 16 mm film; on its first pass through the camera, the film is only exposed along half of its width. When the first pass is complete, the camera is opened and the spools are flipped and swapped (the design of the spool hole ensures that this happens properly) and the same film is then exposed along its other edge, the edge left unexposed on the first pass. After processing, the film is split down the middle, resulting in two lengths of 8 mm film, each with a single row of perforations along one edge, thereby yielding four times as many frames from the same amount of 16 mm film — and hence the cost savings. Because of the two passes of the film, the format was sometimes called Double 8. The frame size of regular 8 mm is 4.8 mm x 3.5 mm and 1 meter of film contains 264 pictures. Normally Double 8 is filmed at 16 frames per second.

Common length film spools allowed filming of about 3 minutes to 4.5 minutes at 12, 15, 16 and 18 frames per second.

Kodak ceased sales of standard 8 mm film in the early 1990s, but continued to manufacture the film, which was sold via independent film stores. Black-and-white 8 mm film is still manufactured in the Czech Republic, and several companies buy bulk quantities of 16 mm film to make regular 8 mm by re-perforating the stock, cutting it into 25 foot (7.6 m) lengths, and collecting it into special standard 8 mm spools which they then sell. Re-perforation requires special equipment. Some specialists also produce Super 8 mm film from existing 16 mm, or even 35 mm film stock.

PS. i’m pretty sure KODAK just went bankrupt. more on that and my life long loving relationship with KODAK! 

20120310-144142.jpgClearly I’ve got some research to do. I’ll keep you all posted on my low fi adventures!

I’D LOVE HEAR COMMENTS / FEEDBACK FROM OTHERS THAT USE REEL TO REEL.

PLEASE EMAIL ME OR ADD A COMMENT BELOW – I COULD USE ANY WEB LINKS / ONLINE COMPANIES THAT COULD OFFER PARTS/ EDUCATION VIDEOS.. thanks! 

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TERRACYCLE STORE !!!

These  are  the awesome Garbage Moguls folks.. see their video posted earlier in my OLDER POSTS, under national geographic channel movies. This store and all the ideas for recycling and UPCYCLING are inspiring and forward thinking.

What can you remodel instead of throw out?

terracycle store ! <— click here.